Even though this particular writer had heard the same advice from multiple agents, she refused to believe that there was anything wrong with her manuscript. No, the problem was with everyone else — the agents, the editors, the monolithic monster known as New York publishing. Everyone, including yours truly, was telling her that her story needed a central conflict, but she refused to re-write her novel. She was right, and everyone else was wrong.

Even though this particular writer had heard the same advice from multiple agents, she refused to believe that there was anything wrong with her manuscript. No, the problem was with everyone else — the agents, the editors, the monolithic monster known as New York publishing. Everyone, including yours truly, was telling her that her story needed a central conflict, but she refused to re-write her novel. She was right, and everyone else was wrong.

Tess Gerritsen at Murderati.

I found this article to be less about accepting advice, and more about the fact that the writer in question was completely lacking in self-awareness, which is another monster entirely. She didn’t know the basics of her industry, or even the basics of storytelling. That’s not a matter of not listening to advice; it’s a matter of her not knowing what the hell she’s doing. It really is that simple.

You have to know the rules in order to break them, so if she’s so confident that she can defy all conventions of mainstream genres and create some revolutionary sort of narrative structure despite all protestations to the contrary, then good on her. But it’s clear she hasn’t the most basic clue as to what constitutes a readable (or marketable) story.

(original post via frageelaytwit)

posted 5/6/09 at 12:31pm to Uncategorized · 0 replies · »

Leave a reply